Spirit in the Wind

mamaspookat:

h-i-l-a-r-i-o-u-s:

crestadair:

bioterrorist:

emubutt:

soupybeard:

Why I hate myself

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Volume I

Pocket edition 

font size 7

Introduction 

to the first chapter

of the prologue

the-doctress:

super-highschool-level-homestuck:

iprayforangels:

plushestrumpest:

30secondstocalifornia:

wingscanspeak:

zorobro:

wingscannotspeak:

peetasboxers:

kissyourneck-slitmythroat:

I showed this post to my boyfriend and he tried to take his shirt off like a girl and 

uh

yeah

Out of the 82k notes my post got this is by far the best comment holy shit thank u for being u

So i tried it both ways and uh

i mean how do you do the first one without pulling out all your hair?

this made me laugh really hard….

and it made me realize that girls and boys pull their shirt off differently. /amazed

but seriously I think girls just do the cross arm thing because of HAIR like demonstrated 

So one year, one URL change, and a hair cut later, I decide to try again… FOR SCIENCE! 

Its not science unless you write it down so 

First method:

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Well done, i guess…

Second:

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I fucked up

Girls… how?

I DON’T UNDERSTAND HOW WE CAN HAVE SUCH DIFFERENT WAYS OF TAKING OFF SHIRTS AND SO MUCH DIFFICULTY DOING IT THE OTHER WAY

I FIGURED IT OUT!!!!!

It’s all in the way that girl/boys shirts are made.

Girls shirts have less armpit room then boy’s do and are generally shorter so pulling it off over your head is more practical because by lifting your arms all the way up you make enough room for the sleeves to just slip off.

Boys shirts have more room and are generally longer so it is easy to slip them off over your head.

but if you take a girls shirt off like a boys shirt you will get your arms caught because there isn’t much armpit space.

and if you take a boys shirt off like a girls shit you will still have your head in it when you’ve lifted your arms all the way up because of the shirt’s length.

It has nothing to do with us. It is entirely to do with how our shirts are made. I figured it out for you. YOU’RE WELCOME!

bless you

This post was so informative.

vvankinq:

Go on, tell them I ate your homework. They’ll never believe you.

vvankinq:

Go on, tell them I ate your homework. They’ll never believe you.

eyecaging:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding RulesHere’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!-Norm


Thanks my awesome animooter frand Ju Li Khaw who is Supreme Emperor of Motion.

eyecaging:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding Rules

Here’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!

-Norm

Thanks my awesome animooter frand Ju Li Khaw who is Supreme Emperor of Motion.

pheberoni:

yeha

pheberoni:

yeha

London Grammar - Nightcall
28,555 plays

Nightcall | London Grammar

I’m gonna tell you something
You don’t want to hear

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

Reblog if you have fewer than 1,000 followers.

sherlocksrosetyler:

omgraniaposts:

unmasqed:

beaksunderwings:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

lillianorchid:

wrong-side-down:

god-of-gold:

jennstarkid:

tumblr nobodies, UNITE!!

i think you mean…

ASSEMBLE.

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for once the supernatural fandom didn’t arrive first

I’m proud of you avengers! 

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Are we late?

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We’re coming!

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Rebloging twice cuz it’s so awesome

Oh dear, am I late.. Sorry…

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sixpenceee:

Déjà Vu

Déjà vu is the experience of being certain that you have experienced or seen a new situation previously – you feel as though the event has already happened or is repeating itself.

The experience is usually accompanied by a strong sense of familiarity and a sense of eeriness, strangeness, or weirdness. The “previous” experience is usually attributed to a dream, but sometimes there is a firm sense that it has truly occurred in the past.

Déjà Vécu

Déjà vécu is what most people are experiencing when they think they are experiencing deja vu.

Déjà vu is the sense of having seen something before, whereas déjà vécu is the experience of having seen an event before, but in great detail – such as recognizing smells and sounds. 

Déjà Visité

Déjà visité is a less common experience and it involves an uncanny knowledge of a new place. For example, you may know your way around a a new town or a landscape despite having never been there, and knowing that it is impossible for you to have this knowledge. 

Déjà Senti

Déjà senti is the phenomenon of having “already felt” something. This is exclusively a mental phenomenon and seldom remains in your memory afterwards.

You could think of it as the feeling of having just spoken, but realizing that you, in fact, didn’t utter a word.

Jamais Vu

Jamais vu (never seen) describes a familiar situation which is not recognized. It is often considered to be the opposite of déjà vu and it involves a sense of eeriness. The observer does not recognize the situation despite knowing rationally that they have been there before.

Chris Moulin, of Leeds University, asked 92 volunteers to write out “door” 30 times in 60 seconds. He reported that 68% of the precipitants showed symptoms of jamais vu, such as beginning to doubt that “door” was a real word. This has lead him to believe that jamais vu may be a symptom of brain fatigue.

Presque Vu

Presque vu is very similar to the “tip of the tongue” sensation – it is the strong feeling that you are about to experience an epiphany – though the epiphany seldom comes. 

L’esprit de l’Escalier

L’esprit de l’escalier (stairway wit) is the sense of thinking of a clever comeback when it is too late. 

Capgras Delusion

Capgras delusion is the phenomenon in which a person believes that a close friend or family member has been replaced by an identical looking impostor. This could be tied in to the old belief that babies were stolen and replaced by changelings in medieval folklore, as well as the modern idea of aliens taking over the bodies of people on earth to live amongst us for reasons unknown. This delusion is most common in people with schizophrenia but it can occur in other disorders.

Fregoli Delusion

Fregoli delusion is a rare brain phenomenon in which a person holds the belief that different people are, in fact, the same person in a variety of disguises. It is often associated with paranoia and the belief that the person in disguise is trying to persecute them.

It was first reported in 1927 in the case study of a 27-year-old woman who believed she was being persecuted by two actors whom she often went to see at the theatre. She believed that these people “pursued her closely, taking the form of people she knows or meets”.

Prosopagnosia

Prosopagnosia is a phenomenon in which a person is unable to recognize faces of people or objects that they should know. People experiencing this disorder are usually able to use their other senses to recognize people – such as a person’s perfume, the shape or style of their hair, the sound of their voice, or even their gait. A classic case of this disorder was presented in the 1998 book (and later Opera by Michael Nyman) called “The man who mistook his wife for a hat”.

SOURCE

roboluvsunicorn:

I rarely have time to sit in place long enough to draw - which is why I’ve been pushing myself to render faster and faster to maximize what few minutes I do have.

I own this micro-blank book about the size of my palm that I carry around with me. It’s really tiny and kinda difficult to keep open/braced while drawing and I can’t really do more than fill it with skulls, but for those times I want to capture a single element, one minute at a time, this book serves its purpose. 

As you can see, I’m bored of drawing skulls but I wanted to go back to square 1 with regards to anatomy.  Also threw in a single page where I attempted a 30 second sketch from the film Le Samourai which is a silly film from 1967 that has nothing to do with samurai - but is source of some of the most beautiful camera work I have seen ever.

Maybe I’ll do noses next.

polarbear-fishbiscuits:

wannabefashionjournalist:

al-the-stuff-i-like:

To think that some people don’t see a problem with society is disturbing

it’s not just disturbing, it’s fucking scary. 

Y’all “rape culture doesn’t exist” preachers can fuck RIGHT off

little-vince:

Bearded Dragon with cardboard by cardboard artist 鍾凱翔 Zhongkai Xiang

oh my god I want to do